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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
faced by all american officials operating overseas, how to remain active in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenged for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and, most importantly, cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of s
rates. the bank announced on tuesday that it will provide an appropriate interest rate environment to support growth as inflation risks lessen. >>> members of the japanese cabinet approved the biggest budget on record for 2013. it totals over $1 trillion. the draft budget reflects shinzo abe's determination to stimulate japanese government by boosting government expenditures. public works spending will increase for the first time in four years. the government plans to spend over $770 billion to implement its policies. that's up about 3% in yen terms from the current fiscal year. it has earmarked more than $240 billion for servicing government debt or an increase of over 1%. also for the first time in four years, tax revenues are expected to exceed what the government would get by issuing new bonds. the government expects tax revenues to total over $473 billion, or nearly 2% more than in this fiscal year. meanwhile, new bond offerings will fall by 3% to about $470 billion. japan still relies on government bond sells for 46% of its total revenue. the outstanding balance of government
of coal. how do you feel growth without wrecking the environment? >> increasingly, it is coming at a huge cost. >> also in the program, we look at what is happening in the world of business. yet another strike in greece. >> the greek tragedy continues as the country comes to a standstill in a massive strike just days after the greek finance minister tells us things are looking good. this is the last year of recession, he said. the problem is that nobody seems to have told that to the millions of greek's on the ground -- greeks on the ground. it is midday in london, 2 p.m. in damascus, where syria has accused israel of carrying out an airstrike in its territory. there has been a reaction from bashar al-assad's allies in moscow. the foreign ministry there has condemn the attack. there is mounting concern about the react -- retaliation in israel itself. there are competing accounts of exactly what the targets were. it is thought that israel was trying to prevent the transfer of weapons to hezbollah militants in the area. >> israel has refused to comment on the reported out -- airstrikes. it
area, have appreciated the goals of our environment and climate change and doing everything that we can. i think the 80%, we're not going to be satisfied with that, spencer. we want 100% zero waste. this is where we're going. >> reporter: is that possible? >> i think it is. it is possible. >> reporter: san francisco residents sven eberlein and debra baida think it's possible, too. they are avid recyclers and composters, so much so that they produce almost no trash. baida lists what goes into the compost bin. >> we put wrappers from our butter, we put any meat or package, that kind of packaged paper food, soiled food wrappings, tissues, q-tips, paper napkins, which we don't have in our home. if those come in, those go there. soiled paper plates, milk cartons. >> i go to travel somewhere, and i'm, you know, i have, like, an apple and "where's the compost?" you know, and i have to throw it in the trash, and it kind of, you know, it just doesn't feel quite right, you know. >> reporter: but not all san franciscans are as enthusiastic as eberlein and baida. those who refuse to sort their garb
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> reporter: others claim women suffer more combat casualties than illnesses and pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain, it's equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women are obviously -- are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize, though, there should be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military. >> reporter: many say it's a question of equal rights and serving in combat allows a soldier to advance through the ranks, farther and faster. >> the bottom line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight, including physical strength, plus courage, plus aptitude, plus leadership and all the things we need for the most effective fighting force. >> reporter: military service chiefs have until may 15 to make their case about which jobs if any should still exclude women. >> jamie: steve c
-lingual time. there are so many parts of the culture where spanish is a huge part of the environment. the speaking english, saying, yes we should do this. this is a tip of the hat to the conservatives. then we change the standards we have out there from state to state. some states have adopted a multi-language requirements for some tests and different aspects of government. do we change all of that? and go right back to english? what does that say to the -- to the latino-speaking community that has spent so much time trying to foster their own language as it were. >> then, after all of that, they guild to the back of the line, for citizenship. michael, thanks for trying to simplify a very complicate the process. have a great day. >> thanks. >> weather alert for you now. an outbreak of dangerous weather. here it is, folks. take a look at the screen, across the midwest, tormaido watches in effect. we will get updates from janet coming up. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of gri
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
question and they always say it's about packaging and the environment changes and then they move up and the other guys move down. >> you mentioned messaging and policy, and what you did not mention was mess efrenger and i generally the pieces that are front and center. >> i asked a question earlier that i just basically ripped off from you so you would be proud. >> thanks. >> chairman rinse priebus just reelected every two years, here what he said about the republican renewal. >> we must compete in every state in every region, building relationships with communities we haven't before. at the rnc, we are dropping the red and blue state analysis. we must be a party concerned about every american in every neighborhood. >> the rhetoric, we've heard a lot of from different members of the gop, but here's my question, molly. how did priebus get another two years after such a bad year for republicans? >> there is a strong feeling among republicans that whatever happened in november was not reince priebus' fault, it was not the rnc's fault. a lot of it is blamed on the romney campaign which
, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root. our interests suffer. our security at home is threatened. >> i think she is trying to warn the administration and the world that we cannot retreat from this engagement here. and right now, overnight, we've seen that the u.s. is doing refueling of french fighters in mali, which is very troublesome to some. it is a much more aggressive posture. but the uk has taken all of their nationals out of somalia overnight. this area of north africa as bob and ted were just saying is the most dangerous perhaps in the world, aside from pakistan and afghanistan which are nuclear armed against each other. and pakistan and india nuclear armed against each other and what's happening in afghanistan as we retreat and the effect on that and north korea. so they have to really not just look at immigration and guns and the budget as the next challenges here. >> have we figured out, senator, what the balance is between invasions, nation building, a huge commitment on the part of the united states in this part of the world, and t
them? >> yes, spencer, we actually do. not only does our department of the environment go out and do audits, we actually have auditors that go out there and make sure that we're all in compliance with the way we measure it, and using the state standards and the state process to do it. >> reporter: so there's no doubt in your mind that the 80% is real. >> oh, no doubt at all, no doubt at all in my mind. >> reporter: whatever the actual number is, recycling and composting don't come free. >> all of the services we provide are paid for by the customers whose material we're taking away. >> reporter: are they paying more in rates because of all this recycling and composting than they would otherwise? >> i would bet they're paying a little more. but if you compare rates in the bay area-- san francisco versus other communities-- we're right in the middle of the pack. and we're doing a lot more recycling than any other communities. >> reporter: residents currently pay about $28 a month for their trash bins; recycling and composting bins are free. but last month, recology requested a rate inc
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kim jong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
of people raising it and how they are raising it given the environment we are in in the aftermath of a terrible tragedy. no gun laws have ever worked to accomplish that. some of the place necessary this country with the strictist gun laws have the most violence. let's have that debate, we are happy to point out that. bill: last week harry reid seemed to suggest that he did not want to put his senate democrats in an uncomfortable situation regarding a vote on gun control. there are 20 democratic senators up for re-election in 2014. is it your belief that he's trying to give them cover? >> well, i understand why, we -- by the way, the right to bear arms is not something we made up. it is a constitutional right and i hope that there are democrats that are uncomfortable about doing things that undermine that. it is a basic fundamental american rights, it's one of the unique rights we have compared to the rest of the world and it's one we won't give up easily i tell that you much. bill: thank you for your time. marco rubio the republican from florida. one of the reasons he was on with
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)